What is The Hypothyroid Diet, how is it different, and will it work for you?

by Dr. Kevin Dobrzynski The Hypothyroid Diet helps you detoxify your body from harmful substances that may be blocking thyroid hormone production. It shows you what foods you need to eat, so you can feed your thyroid the nutrients it needs in order to thrive. It helps you eliminate food allergies/sensitivities and it will show you how to stabilize your blood sugar. Within The Hypothyroid Diet is a system, and I call this system the DES system, which stands for Detoxification, Elimination, and Stabilization. Here’s how it works… Every day, harmful chemicals get into your body that you’re unaware of. These chemicals look just like the minerals your thyroid needs to make thyroid hormone. However, if you are low on the minerals your body needs to produce thyroid hormone, which most Americans are, your body will try to use these harmful chemicals instead, because they look just like the minerals it needs. The result is your body will be unable to make thyroid hormone. This program will help you identify and eliminate the nasty chemicals your body doesn’t need, and it will show you which minerals you do need to make thyroid hormone. The second part of this system helps you eliminate food sensitivities. This is important because most people have food sensitivities and don’t even know it. And if you have food sensitivities, your immune system will be working overtime, because your body thinks there’s a foreign invader inside and it will be constantly trying to fight it. The result can be symptoms like fatigue, weight gain, insomnia, constipation, aches/pains, etc. Plus, when some of these foods get digested and sneak into your blood stream, they resemble thyroid tissue. So, your body will inadvertently attack your thyroid. The last part of The Hypothyroid Diet helps you stabilize your blood sugar. If you can stabilize your blood sugar, you can eliminate cravings, reduce body fat, and have abundant energy throughout the day. This program is different from any other diet because it focuses on jumpstarting your thyroid – the gland that is responsible for your metabolism. Some diets may focus on Detoxification, Eliminating food allergies, or Stabilizing blood sugar, but no program addresses all three. That’s why it works so well. This program is very safe and will work for anyone who has a thyroid problem. In fact, it will help anyone who has an autoimmune disorder, food allergies, or if they just want to lose weight or increase energy. The beauty of the program is that it works fast. Learn what you need to eat and drink and what you need to avoid so you can jumpstart your...

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All About Gluten
Aug13

All About Gluten

The Story on Gluten Remember when it was all the craze to eliminate wheat from your diet because of a known wheat allergy? Well, now you’ll notice that it’s since been narrowed down to gluten, an ingredient found in wheat. Now that we know that gluten is really the culprit, it is no longer just wheat that must be avoided for those with an intolerance, but all food products that contain gluten. So, what’s the problem with this plant protein called gluten? For some people, there’s no problem at all. For others, it can wreak havoc on the body if the immune system recognizes it as a harmful substance. If it does, the small intestine will react negatively, causing inflammation, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. This condition is called celiac disease and is actually considered an autoimmune disorder because the body sees it as an enemy of the digestive track and therefore, rejects it. Symptoms can mild to severe (and in some cases, life-threatening) and a test can confirm the existence of the disease, although some have been known to show a false negative. The best remedy if celiac is suspected is to experiment by eliminating gluten for two weeks to see if there is a decrease or disappearance in symptoms. Other possible reactions to gluten may include hives, weight loss, or asthma. Celiac.Com This is a comprehensive site that was created in 1995 for the sole purpose of helping people with a gluten intolerance or who have celiac disease. It offers news, recipes, diet information, gluten-free specialty company listings, food reviews, and a wealth of information about celiac disease. The biggest gluten culprits: Bread Cookies Crackers Cereals Grains Wheat Barley Rye Non-foods that may have gluten include some cosmetics (particularly lip products), beer, vitamins and other supplements. Oats cannot be tolerated by people with a severe allergy to gluten. The most common naturally gluten-free foods: Rice Corn Potatoes Broiled meats Fruits Soy-based products Grains Quinoa Millet Amaranth Buckwheat Arrowroot Trends and Statistics on Gluten Intolerance This recent Los Angeles Times article sheds light on where we’re headed with shopping gluten-free. It says that in 2007, seven hundred new gluten-free products appeared on the American market. Here is a statistical quote from the article, and its link: According to a March 2007 survey by the market research company Mintel, 8% of the U.S. population look for gluten-free products when they shop. Nielsen Co., which tracks gluten-free food in U.S. grocery, drug and mass merchandiser stores (excluding Wal-Mart), reports that the gluten-free sector increased 20% in the 12-month period ending June 14, to $1.75 billion from $1.46 billion a year ago....

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Best Ginseng Products

If you want more energy, better sexual stamina, increased circulation and immune response…plus a variety of other benefits…you should really add a quality ginseng to your diet. This ancient root has been studied for its beneficial affects on so many illnesses and maladies it’s hard to even begin…from brain health to heart health to cancer-fighting qualities and much more. And it’s one of the best natural energy boosters you’ll find anywhere. So here are a couple of considerations when using this herb: Get a quality product. If you’ve tried ginseng and couldn’t figure out what everyone was talking about, chances are you got a poor quality product. The best ginseng is from Korea and America (although these are completely different in their effects and many people enjoy taking both). It’s also important to get ginseng that is between 4 and 6 years old. Ginseng that is harvested too early is not worth taking. Give yourself a break. Don’t take too much ginseng. Your body will need a break after a month or so of regular use. It’s easy to get used to the extra energy that this botanical provides and forget to take a break. The only negative side effect from ginseng comes with excessive use. Ginseng’s Negative Press In recent months, ginseng has received some negative press and heightened skepticism from opponents of natural medicine and health. This is partially due to so much hype about the benefits of ginseng, which created a backlash — more against the hype than against ginseng itself. The opponents have very little negative to say about the root itself, except that its benefits are not proven. But the benefits of many herbs and plants are unproven. And people will make all kinds of wild claims about the benefits of their favorite herbs…just to increase the importance of what they are taking. Another reason for the backlash is because some people have over-used ginseng and have fatigued their system, including their glands and nervous system. Because it provides energy without the jittery effects of caffeine, some people abuse it just as they would abuse coffee. So remember to use ginseng just as you would use any green drink or other natural remedy — using your body as a guide. Ginex by Il Hwa: Concentrated Korean GinSeng Granules These packets of powder (or granules) are really handy and powerful. Add one packet to about 8 ounces of water (more if you don’t like the taste and want to dilute it). Then shake until the granules have dissolved. You get quality Korean ginseng in pure form mixed with water or your favorite juice or green...

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Comparing Green Superfood Products, Making Sense of Green Drinks
Nov27

Comparing Green Superfood Products, Making Sense of Green Drinks

UPDATED November 27, 2010 by Christopher Van Buren The number of green superfood powders that have sprouted up lately is astonishing. Now there are more than 150 brands on the market and they all have different formulas and offer different health benefits. But not only are there numerous products…but the number of herbs, veggie powders, grasses and grains used in these mixtures is nearly endless. So this article is your first stop for making some sense of this chaos. Here, you’ll get a bird’s eye view of the green drink market and what you should look for in a product. See the list of related articles at the end to take your investigation to the next level. I’ll make an effort to include as many of the green drinks reviewed on this site in this roundup article, so you can place them into the basic categories I have identified: Simple Formulas, Well Rounded Formulas, and Super Robust Formulas. I’ve also added a new category, called Specialized Formulas for those products that are attempting to accomplish something outside the normal range of green drink nutrition. I will add new products to this comparison as I become aware of them and if they are as good or better than those listed here. Key Ingredients Let’s begin with how these products overlap. That is, what are the basic ingredients that all, or most, green drinks include? Most green superfood drinks all contain some amount of the following ingredients: Land Vegetables (such as beets, spinach, grasses, dandelion, etc.) Sea Vegetables (kelp, purple dulse) Algaes (mainly spirulina and chlorella) Probiotics and Enzymes (the type and source differs) Fibrous Meal (flaxseed meal, brown rice solids, apple pectin, lecithin, and others) The amounts of each of these ingredients may vary substantially from product to product. Some are heavy in the algaes while others favor land veggies. I look for at least 2 grams per serving being comprised of land vegetables, sea vegetables, and/or algaes, with a under 2 grams of fibrous meal, which is used like a natural filler to bulk up the product in most cases (not that lecithin or flax meal is not healthy, but I give more points for the better, more expensive, ingredients). Beyond this basic list, products may feature certain ingredients that add flavor or special qualities, such as energy enhancement or intestinal cleansing. Special Additions There’s nothing that says a green drink formula must have healthy herbs and extracts in addition to the key ingredients listed above. A green drink that has excellent quality, but offers only basic ingredients may be highly recommended, even though it falls into the Simple...

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The Truth About Sugar and Other Sweeteners

This is a quick view of sweeteners for those of you who want to enhance the taste of your green drinks, while remaining healthy. I’m not even going to talk about artificial sweeteners, such as saccharine and Aspartame. These are highly toxic chemicals and should never EVER be considered as a sweetener. In fact, you should never ingest any of these toxic chemicals for any reason. You’d be better off with ANY of the sweeteners listed below. Sugar, Evaporated Cane Juice, Unprocessed Sugar, Maple Syrup, Molasses Sucrose sugar, which is made from sugar cane and sugar beets is 50% fructose and 50% glucose. The glucose is a simple sugar that gets processed quickly by the body into energy. Thus the energy spike when you eat sugar. If your blood-sugar metabolism is normal, then your body processes half of the sugar (the glucose) into energy quickly, while the other half (the fructose) is probably stored as fat. Sugar is high on the glycemic index, so it’s not good for diabetics and should not be eaten in excess. When it comes to sucrose sugar, I prefer the least amount of processing, which means the evaporated cane juice (pure cane sugar) and maple syrup are the best. Molasses is basically cane juice that is cooked down into a dark syrup and unprocessed sugar is actually semi-processed sugar. You can also find pure sugarcane sugar in block form and grind it or cut it into chunks for your various needs. Fructose, Corn Syrup Fructose is the sugar that comes from corn (high fructose corn syrup) and many types of fruit. When we eat fructose, the liver and digestive system converts some of it into energy, but store much of it as fat. In fact, fructose is practically all carbs, so it can lead to weight gain quite easily. It is low on the glycemic index, so it does not cause blood sugar spikes, but that’s offset (for diabetics) by the growing evidence that it enhances the body’s resistance to insulin, thus increasing risk of diabetes. So the truth about fructose is that it comes from corn and it has the same nutrients as sugar (practically none) and it’s stored as fat when sugar is burned as energy. Sugar gets burned first. Then fructose. Xylitol A derivative of birch wood, Xylitol is not actually a sugar, but a sugar alcohol. Its chemical properties are different than sugar, which makes it safe for diabetics and less harmful on the teeth and on the waistline. It was discovered in Germany in the 1970s and is studied for its use as a sugar substitute. Sweet as Stevia…er,...

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Green Superfood Comparison Chart

UPDATED August 24, 2008 In this third installment on green superfood powders, I’ve prepared a handy comparison chart that shows the ingredients of several products side-by-side. This makes it easier to compare and contrast the different products. Although this completes my series on green superfood powders for the time being, I will update these various comparisons and listings as needed, so check back from time to time to see the new additions and updates. As for the chart, you can view it in pdf format (Adobe Reader required) or download it using this link: Green Superfood Comparison Chart or the link in the right column at the bottom of the list of green drinks. I’ve also created a quick-view Green Drink Price Comparison Chart. When viewing this chart, remember that this only shows the price and does not compare the quality. You can see this chart using the link: Green Drink Price Comparison Chart. More to come. Send me your comments and additional information about green drinks you want added to the chart (use the response form on the About...

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